Powershell Replace all child object permission entries with inheritable permission entries from this object

How could would it be if in Powershell there’d be an option to Replace all child object permission entries with inheritable permission entries from this object, like we have in the GUI when applying permissions?

Well, there isn’t :), at least not for now (20181003), but I found a workaround that seems to be working pretty good.

When would we need this?

This is really handy to reset NTFS permissions from a certain level. Imagine this folder structure:

-Folder1 (inheritance disabled, John in Read Only and Albert in Read/Write)
–SubFolder1 (inherited from Folder1)
—-File1.txt (inherited from SubFolder1 plus Mark in Read Only)
—-File2.txt (inherited from SubFolder1)
–SubFolder2 (inherited from Folder1 plus Simon in Read/Write)
—-Sub-SubFolder1 (inherited from SubFolder2 plus Michael in Read Only)
—-Sub-SubFolder2 (inheritnace disabled, John in Read and Write)
–File1.txt (inherited from Folder1 – This is located under Folder1)

I hope you don’t actually have such a permission mess, as this would be bad, however this is just to generalize the example. Let’s also say that Folder1’s permissions are ok and we want to make sure they get replicated under every item recursively. So we want to remove Mark from accessing File1.txt, Simon from SubFolder2, Michael from Sub-SubFolder1 and also, we want to re-enable the inheritance from Sub-SubFolder2 (removing John as well). This is something you can force through with the GUI by flagging Replace all child object permission entries with inheritable permission entries from this object in the Advanced Security Settings.

So, this is fairly simple, but it’s really not cool when you’re trying to automate a permission setup process.

The logic behind the workaround

Let’s first talk about the example we have above, so we’re happy with Folder 1, how do I go and make sure every sub-folder/file will inherit the same permissions and will also remove any addition and reset the inheritance from the parent? (more…)

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Run a command as a different user in Powershell

There are three main ways to run a command as a different user in Powershell, besides the classing Right click shift. This article will show you how to do that, within the same Powershell session.
By the same Powershell session, I mean something like this:

  • You’re logged on as ITDroplets\UserA.
  • You have a powershell script/console running as UserA.
  • Within that powershell script/console, you want to run a command as ITDroplets\UserB.

In the Options below, I will consider the above example and I will run “Get-Process Explorer” as UserB. This is very handy when running elevated commands, for instance when UserA is a standard user account and UserB has local admin rights. Of course, Get-Process Explorer doesn’t really need elevation 🙂
Remember that the examples are super concentrated, which means I didn’t add any check to see if the command ran successfully etc. They’re there as pure examples, you can then shape them to fit your needs.

Option 1 – System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo

(more…)

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Resource Win7Only referenced in attribute displayName could not be found

This error appears when you have updated the ADML and ADMX file to Windwos 10, version 1803. Let’s see how to fix it!

When trying to editing a policy, you receive this error: Resource ‘$(string id=Win7Only)’ referenced in attribute displayName could not be found.

This is a known issue for Microsoft, in fact there was an update in the Windows 10 version 1803’s SearchOCR.ADML file and this line was missed in the new ADML file:

<string id=”Win7Only”>Microsoft Windows 7 or later</string>

The way I used to fix this was to manually editing SearchOCR.ADML.

Editing SearchOCR.ADML

  • Make a copy of \Policies\PolicyDefinitions\en-us\searchocr.adml. Normally this path is under \\yourdomain\sysvol\yourdomain. This is needed in case the file you’ll edit gets corrupted.
  • With a text editor, open \Policies\PolicyDefinitions\en-us\searchocr.adml and search for <string id=”OCREveryPage”>Force TIFF IFilter to perform OCR for every page in a TIFF document</string>.
    • The line above this, should be: <string id=”OCR”>OCR</string>
  • Add the following string, right after <string id=”OCR”>OCR</string>:
    • <string id=”Win7Only”>Microsoft Windows 7 or later</string>
  • Save the file and try again (allow some time for replication if you have multiple Domain Controllers).

EDIT: There’s a KB from MS finally released for this HERE.

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Add output to PVOutput with Powershell

In this article, we will see how to setup your PVOutput account in order to add output to PVOutput with Powershell.

I found a ton of info on how to add Ouput to PVOutput with curl, but nearly nothing (as I needed it) for Powershell. No wonder why I received a couple of questions on this.

If you’re the owner of a GoodWe inverter, take a look at Get GoodWe data with Powershell.

I don’t want to go too deep, so in this article I will just explain how to send data to your own system on PVOutput and how to set up the account to be able to do so.

Set your PVOutput account

In order to make API calls to PVOutput, against your system, you’ll need to enable API Access and generate a new API Key. You will also need the System Id you want to manage.

This is super easy as it’s all located in the same area of the account settings.

  • Login to PVOutput
  • Click Settings
  • Scroll at the bottom and:
    • Enable API Access
    • Click New Key to generate a new Key
    • Write down your system ID
    • Save

That’s it! We’re ready to send data to our system.

Note: Before proceeding, make sure your system is correctly set up. You need to ensure you’ve added the right amount of solar panels as well as the correct Watt hour or else you may end up receiving errors.

A very simple script

So, this script is very simple and will just show you how to send your system’s outputs to PVOutput. I strongly recommend adding a Try/Catch to make sure you Catch any error (so that you can also set up an alert, perhaps with Telegram: Automating Telegram Messages with Powershell) and, most importantly, you want to automatically get the date, time etc automatically (look at Get GoodWe data with Powershell to see how I grabbed these info from my inverter).

Super easy! You can add more functionalities, like I said above. One of them could also be checking for the Content (or Status/Description) that will be held in $PVOutputInvokeResult:

Have fun 🙂

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